Monday, July 9, 2012

New Republican Governors Beat out the New Democrats for Employment Increases


Republicans certainly aren’t perfect. But they do seem to have a definitive edge on Democrats when it comes to economic policy. (And marital fidelity, and logic and patriotism and…)

Back in 2010, individual states placed their votes for governor, and many of them saw new faces in office as a result. Some of this was due to previous governors choosing not to run again and some of it was due to sitting politicians being ousted.

Out of the lot, seventeen states voted in new Republicans and eight voted in new Democrats. Two years later, the results (courtesy of Examiner.com) seem to speak for themselves.

Of those who voted in new Republican governors: 
  • Kansas’ unemployment decreased 0.8%
  • Maine’s unemployment decreased 0.6%
  • Michigan’s unemployment decreased 2.4%
  • New Mexico’s unemployment decreased 1.0%
  • Oklahoma’s unemployment decreased 1.4%
  • Pennsylvania’s unemployment decreased 0.6%
  • Tennessee’s unemployment decreased 1.6%
  • Wisconsin’s unemployment decreased 0.9%
  • Wyoming’s unemployment decreased 1.1%
  • Alabama’s unemployment decreased 1.9%
  • Georgia’s unemployment decreased 1.2%
  • South Carolina’s unemployment decreased 1.5%
  • South Dakota’s unemployment decreased 0.7%
  • Florida’s unemployment decreased 2.3%
  • Nevada’s unemployment decreased 2.2%
  • Iowa’s unemployment decreased 1.0%
  • Ohio’s unemployment decreased 1.7%

 And of those who voted in new Democrat Governors:
  • Colorado’s unemployment decreased 0.7%
  • New York’s unemployment increased 0.4%
  • Oregon’s unemployment decreased 1.5%
  • California’s unemployment decreased 1.3%
  • Connecticut’s unemployment decreased 1.5%
  • Hawaii’s unemployment decreased 0.4%
  • Minnesota’s unemployment decreased 1.2%
  • Vermont’s unemployment decreased 1.4% 

All told, that makes an average drop of 1.35% for Team Republican and 0.95% for Team Democrat. It also seems perfectly relevant to note that there wasn’t a single new Republican governor that presided over an unemployment increase – unlike New York – and there wasn’t a single new Democrat governor that presided over an employment increase greater than 1.5%, unlike six of their political rivals.

Without further study into the bigger picture in each case (including whether they had matching majorities in their state legislators and whether they were actually following typical conservative or liberal economic plans), it’s impossible to say definitively whether the results highlighted above prove that Republicans handle the economy better than Democrats.

But what can be said is that, one way or the other, the Democrats have some obvious catching up to do. 

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